accuse


accuse
accuse, charge, incriminate, indict, impeach, arraign denote in common to declare a person guilty of a fault or offense.
Accuse is typically immediate and personal and often suggests directness or sharpness of imputation or censure; charge frequently connotes seriousness in the offense and formality in the declaration; one may accuse a bystander of trying to pick one’s pocket (an accusation which may become a formal charge before a magistrate); one accuses a man of cheating (an offense which one personally resents); one charges a man with cheating (an infraction of the rules of a game).
Incriminate may mean to charge with crime or serious offense
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your friend thinks he can clear Ken by incriminating poor Wayne—G. V. Williams

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careful study . . . has failed to show that any of the cultivable bacteria can be incriminated as the cause of colds— Andrewes

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but in current use it more often means to involve or inculpate in crime
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incriminating evidence

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the answer need not reveal a crime in order to be incriminating. It is enough if it . . . leads to proof of an illegal act— Gressman

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Indict adds to charge in legal context the implications of a formal consideration of the evidence by a grand jury or in general use by someone acting in the role of jury and of a decision that the accused person should be called to trial or to an accounting
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the jury refused to indict the men accused of arson

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I indict those citizens whose easy consciences condone such wrongdoings— Roosevelt

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Impeach implies legally a charge of malfeasance in office formally brought against a public officer by a branch of the government constitutionally authorized to bring such charges
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the House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson of high crimes and misdemeanors

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In nontechnical language impeach or its noun impeachment implies a direct charge which demands an answer
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any intelligent and noble-minded American can with reason take that side . . . without having either his reason or his integrity impeachedKenneth Roberts

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“You buy your loves. ” . . . he did not plead verbally against the impeachmentMeredith

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To arraign is to call or bring a prisoner-before a court to answer to the charge of an indictment
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I was carried down to the Sessions house, where I was arraignedDefoe

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Figuratively it means to call a person or thing to public account for something done or omitted
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arraigns the monks for teaching grammar rather than things spiritual— H. O. Taylor

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a despairing soliloquy . . . in which he arraigns the United States policy in relation to China— Times Lit. Sup.

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Analogous words: denounce, blame, reprobate, censure, *criticize
Antonyms: exculpate
Contrasted words: exonerate, vindicate, acquit, absolve (see EXCULPATE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • accusé — accusé, ée [ akyze ] n. • XIIIe; de accuser 1 ♦ Personne à qui on impute une faute, un délit (⇒aussi inculpé, prévenu). L accusé bénéficie jusqu au jugement de la présomption d innocence. Dr. Inculpé qu un arrêt de la Chambre d accusation a… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • accusé — accusé, ée (a ku zé, zée) 1°   Part. passé. Accusé d un crime. Accusé d aspirer au trône. •   Les vents, les mêmes vents si longtemps accusés Ne te couvriront pas de ses vaisseaux brisés ?, RAC. Iph. V, 4. •   Un homme, justement accusé d… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Accuse — Ac*cuse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accused}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accusing}.] [OF. acuser, F. accuser, L. accusare, to call to account, accuse; ad + causa cause, lawsuit. Cf. {Cause}.] 1. To charge with, or declare to have committed, a crime or offense;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accuse — ac·cuse vb ac·cused, ac·cus·ing [Latin accusare to find fault with, charge with a crime, from ad to, at + causa legal case, trial] vt: to charge with an offense judicially or by a public process compare indict vi: to make or bring an accusation… …   Law dictionary

  • accusé — Accusé, [accus]ée. part. Il a les significations de son verbe. Accusé de meurtre, de vol, &c. Il est quelquefois substantif. L Accusateur & l accusé. tout accusé n est pas coupable …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • accuse — [ə kyo͞oz′] vt. accused, accusing [ME acusen < OFr acuser < L accusare, to call to account < ad , to + causa, CAUSE] 1. to find at fault; blame 2. to bring formal charges against (of doing wrong, breaking the law, etc.) the accused Law… …   English World dictionary

  • accuse — UK US /əˈkjuːz/ verb [T] LAW ► to say that someone has done something wrong or illegal: accuse sb of (doing) sth »He is accused of misleading investors and lenders about the financial health of the company …   Financial and business terms

  • accuse — (v.) c.1300, charge (with an offense, etc.), impugn, blame, from O.Fr. acuser to accuse, indict, reproach, blame (13c.), earlier announce, report, disclose (12c.), or directly from L. accusare to call to account, from ad against (see AD (Cf. ad… …   Etymology dictionary

  • accuse — ► VERB (often accuse of) 1) charge with an offence or crime. 2) claim that (someone) has done (something wrong). DERIVATIVES accusatory adjective accuser noun. ORIGIN Latin accusare call to account , from causa reason, motive, lawsuit …   English terms dictionary

  • Accuse — Ac*cuse , n. Accusation. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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